Temperature Influence on Acetyllysine Interaction with Glucose in Model Systems due to Maillard Reaction

Authors

  • K. ANANTH NARAYAN,

    1. Authors Narayan is with the Technology Acquisition Division, Food Engineering Directorate, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center, Natick, MA. 01760. Author Cross is with the Blood Research Division, Letterman Army Institute of Research, Presidio of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94129. Address inquiries to Dr. Narayan.
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  • MICHAEL E. CROSS

    1. Authors Narayan is with the Technology Acquisition Division, Food Engineering Directorate, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center, Natick, MA. 01760. Author Cross is with the Blood Research Division, Letterman Army Institute of Research, Presidio of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94129. Address inquiries to Dr. Narayan.
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  • Presented in part at the 1989 IFT Annual meeting, Chicago, June 2629. We thank J. Jarboe, W.L. Porter, C.P. Dunne, and M. Lightbody, US Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (Natick) and K.W. Whitburn, Framingham State college for review of the manuscript. We acknowledge valuable discussions on curve fitting with Ron Segars and Landa Hoke, Natick The invaluable help of J. Jarboe in the analysis of cellulose, of E. Powers and D. Munsey in the determination of water activity, of Capt. K. Narayan, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma in the creation of expert graphics and data processing software, and of A.M. Huwe for her excellent secretarial assistance is gratefully acknowledged.

ABSTRACT

The interaction between N-α-acetyllysine and glucose was investigated in a dry cellulose matrix (1.8% moisture) at 40, 50 and 60°C and aw 0.19-0.21. The loss in acetyllysine in 6 days at those temperatures was 22, 54, and 79%, respectively. The degradation data more clearly fit a double exponential function (AeBX+ CeDX) than the first order function, AeBX. An estimate of the activation energy of 36 kcal/ mol and a Q10 of 5.5 was computed from second order rate constants for acetyllysine and glucose degradation. The increase in color followed zero order kinetics and indicated an activation energy of 44 kcal/mol for the presumed third phase of the Maillard reaction in the solid state.

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