Characterization of Polypropylene and Polyester Meltblown Materials used for Food Oil Absorption

Authors

  • DANIEL W. PHIFER JR.,

    1. Authors Phifer and Costello are with the Dept. of Nutrition, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Agricultural Experiment Station, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1900. Address inquiries to Dr. C.A. Costello.
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  • CAROL A. COSTELLO

    1. Authors Phifer and Costello are with the Dept. of Nutrition, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Agricultural Experiment Station, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1900. Address inquiries to Dr. C.A. Costello.
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  • This research was partially sponsared by the Univ. of Tennessee Agricultural Bxperiment Station, Textile & Nonwoven Development Center (TANDEC), Univ. of Tenmesea, and the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, as part of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Pmgram, under contract DE-ACO5-84OR21400 managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems. Inc.

ABSTRACT

Meltblown polypropylene and polyester and paper towels were examined for food oil absorption capacity by weight difference method. Six food oils (coconut, corn, cottonseed, olive, safflower, and sunflower) were used to include a range of fatty acid compositions. Materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy to note physical characteristics that related to absorption. Polypropylene absorbed 33.4% of the oils compared to 25.1% for polyester and 24.2% for paper towels. This was noted by the large pore size and small diameter fibers forming great numbers of pockets which could include oil. Polypropylene material should be considered in microwavable packaging as means to decrease dietary fat.

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