Calcium Chloride and Potassium Sorbate Reduce Sodium Chloride used during Natural Cucumber Fermentation and Storage

Authors

  • A.A. GUILLOU,

    1. Authors Guillou, Floras, and Cousin are with Purdue University, Dept. of Food Science, 1160 Smith Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Address inquiries to Dr. J.D. Floros.
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  • J.D. FLOROS,

    1. Authors Guillou, Floras, and Cousin are with Purdue University, Dept. of Food Science, 1160 Smith Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Address inquiries to Dr. J.D. Floros.
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  • M.A. COUSIN

    1. Authors Guillou, Floras, and Cousin are with Purdue University, Dept. of Food Science, 1160 Smith Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Address inquiries to Dr. J.D. Floros.
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  • This work is a contribution (paper # 13063) of the Purdue Agricultural Experiment Station, based on paper #544 presented at the 51st Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, Dallas, TX, June 1-5, 1991. It was partly supported by a grant from the Indiana Department of Commerce, Value Added Center. We express appreciation to Mr. Steve Power for invaluable technical advice and support.

ABSTRACT

Cucumber fermentation characteristics and pickle quality were evaluated in brines containing equilibrium concentrations of 0-0.4% CaCl2, 0-0.4% potassium sorbate and 0-10% NaCl. Changes in brine pH and acidity, cucumber texture and color, coliforms, lactic acid and total bacteria, yeasts and molds were followed over time. Results indicated that cucumber spoilage would eventually take place if NaCl or potassium sorbate were not present in the brine. The presence of CaCl2 helped maintain cucumber firmness. A synergistic action between NaCl, CaCl2 and potassium sorbate was seen, which allowed good quality pickles to be produced when moderate amounts of all three components were present in the brine (5% NaCl, 0.2% CaCl2, 0.2% potassium sorbate).

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