Recovered Protein and Reconditioned Water from Surimi Processing Waste

Authors

  • TEIN M. LIN,

    1. Authors Lin, Park, and Morrissey are affiliated with the Seafood Laboratory, Oregon State Univ., 250 36th St., Astoria, OR 97103. Address inquiries to Dr. Jae W. Park
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  • JAE W. PARK,

    1. Authors Lin, Park, and Morrissey are affiliated with the Seafood Laboratory, Oregon State Univ., 250 36th St., Astoria, OR 97103. Address inquiries to Dr. Jae W. Park
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  • MICHAEL T. MORRISSEY

    1. Authors Lin, Park, and Morrissey are affiliated with the Seafood Laboratory, Oregon State Univ., 250 36th St., Astoria, OR 97103. Address inquiries to Dr. Jae W. Park
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  • This work was partially supported by grant no. NA89AA-D-SG108 (project no. R-SF-S) from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to the Oregon State University Sea Grant College Program and by appropriations made by the Oregon State Legislature. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NOAA or any of its subagencies. This research project was also supported by Oregon Trawl Commission and Center for Apphed Agricultural Research, Oregon Dept. of Agriculture.

ABSTRACT

Micro- and ultrafiltration were utilized for recovery of proteins and for water recycling from commercial surimi processing waste water. The proteins recovered by microfiltration showed highly functional properties and composition comparable with proteins in regular surimi. Surimi with a substitution (10%) of recovered proteins did not diminish in gel hardness, elasticity, color, or water retention. Aerobic plate count, chemical oxygen demand, protease activity, and turbidity in the surimi waste waters were reduced by ultrafiltration. Results indicated a potential for recovering proteins to extend yield and recycling water.

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