Gel Properties of Surimi from Pacific Herring

Authors

  • K.D. REPPOND,

    1. Authors Reppond and Babbitt are with the National Marine Fisheries Service, Utilization Research Division, 900 Trident Way, Kodiak, AK 99615. Authors Berntsen and Tsuruta are with Western Alaska Fisheries. P. O. Box 2367, Kodiak, AK 99615.
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  • J.K. BABBITT,

    1. Authors Reppond and Babbitt are with the National Marine Fisheries Service, Utilization Research Division, 900 Trident Way, Kodiak, AK 99615. Authors Berntsen and Tsuruta are with Western Alaska Fisheries. P. O. Box 2367, Kodiak, AK 99615.
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  • S. BERNTSEN,

    1. Authors Reppond and Babbitt are with the National Marine Fisheries Service, Utilization Research Division, 900 Trident Way, Kodiak, AK 99615. Authors Berntsen and Tsuruta are with Western Alaska Fisheries. P. O. Box 2367, Kodiak, AK 99615.
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  • M. TSURUTA

    1. Authors Reppond and Babbitt are with the National Marine Fisheries Service, Utilization Research Division, 900 Trident Way, Kodiak, AK 99615. Authors Berntsen and Tsuruta are with Western Alaska Fisheries. P. O. Box 2367, Kodiak, AK 99615.
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ABSTRACT

Surimi produced from male Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallusi), a by-product of the roe fishery, formed gels comparable to those formed by lower-grade pollock surimi but were darker in color. Linear relationships were found between moisture content of surimi and punch force, torsion stress, torsion strain, and compression force at failure. Addition of dried beef plasma, egg white, whey protein, wheat gluten or potato inhibitor resulted in stronger gels, although no proteolysis was detected in a control sample. Low-temperature setting, or heating at 40°C prior to cooking at 90°C resulted in stronger gels, as measured by punch test.

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