Radish Anthocyanin Extract as a Natural Red Colorant for Maraschino Cherries

Authors

  • M. MÓNICA GIUSTI,

    1. Authors Giusti and Wrolstad, with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331–6602. Address inquiries to Dr. R. E. Wrolstad.
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  • RONALD E. WROLSTAD

    1. Authors Giusti and Wrolstad, with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331–6602. Address inquiries to Dr. R. E. Wrolstad.
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  • We thank Robert W. Durst and Luis E. Rodriguez-Saona for technical assistance and Oregon Cherry Growers and Gray and Co. for brined cherries. This work was supported by Grant 94–37500–0808 from the USDA NRI Competitive Grants Program and a grant from Oregon Department of Agriculture's Center for Applied Agricultural Research (CAAR). Matching funds for the CAAR grant were provided by the Oregon Sweet Cherry Commission and the Northwest Cherry Briners Association. This is technical paper 10,823 from the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station.

ABSTRACT

Red radish anthocyanin extract (RAE) was investigated to color brined cherries as an alternative to FD&C Red No. 40. Primary and secondary bleached cherries were colored using two concentrations of RAE (600 and 1200 mg/L syrup, C1 and C2) and FD&C Red No. 40 (200 ppm). Color and pigment stability of secondary bleached cherries and syrup colored with RAE were evaluated during storage (25°C). CIELAB, chroma and hue angle, showed that RAE imparted color extremely close to that of FD&C Red No. 40, for > 6 mo storage. Monomeric anthocyanin degradation followed first-order kinetics, with half-lives of 29 and 33 wk for syrups colored with RAE C1 and RAE C2, respectively. Higher anthocyanin concentration exerted a protective effect on color stability. Exposure to light slightly accelerated L*, a*, and monomeric anthocyanin degradation.

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