Lipid Oxidation in Cooked Turkey as Affected by Added Antioxidant Enzymes

Authors

  • S.K. LEE,

    1. Author Lee is with the Dept. of Animal Products Science, Kang-won National University, Chunchon, Kangwondo 200–701, South Korea. Authors Mei and Decker are with the Dept. of Food Science, Chenoweth Laboratory, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003. Address inquiries to Dr. E.A. Decker.
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  • L. MEI,

    1. Author Lee is with the Dept. of Animal Products Science, Kang-won National University, Chunchon, Kangwondo 200–701, South Korea. Authors Mei and Decker are with the Dept. of Food Science, Chenoweth Laboratory, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003. Address inquiries to Dr. E.A. Decker.
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  • E.A. DECKER

    1. Author Lee is with the Dept. of Animal Products Science, Kang-won National University, Chunchon, Kangwondo 200–701, South Korea. Authors Mei and Decker are with the Dept. of Food Science, Chenoweth Laboratory, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003. Address inquiries to Dr. E.A. Decker.
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ABSTRACT

Catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were added to turkey which had been cooked (80°C) to provide minimal activity of both enzymes, to determine their effects in development of lipid oxidation. CAT (100–500 U/g muscle) decreased the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) 4–28% during 2 days of storage. GSH-Px (4.0 U/g muscle) decreased TBARS 8–11%. CAT (170 U/g muscle) and GSH-Px (1.3 U/g muscle) in combination decreased TBARS formation 7–14%. Reduced glutathione concentrations in the turkey were unaffected by cooking. These data suggest that heat inactivation of CAT and GSH-Px was not the only factor involved in heat-induced lipid oxidation reactions in turkey thigh muscle.

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