Permeability Properties of Fruit Puree Edible Films

Authors

  • T.H. McHUGH,

    1. Authors McHugh and Huxsoll are affiliated with the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Western Regional Research Center, 800 Buchanan Street, Albany, CA 94710.
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  • C.C. HUXSOLL,

    1. Authors McHugh and Huxsoll are affiliated with the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Western Regional Research Center, 800 Buchanan Street, Albany, CA 94710.
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  • J.M. KROCHTA

    1. Author Krochta is affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616.
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  • This research was supported by Cooperative Research Agreement No. 58-5325-3-425 between the USDA's Agricultural Research Service and the Univ. of California at Davis.

  • Names are necessary to report factually on available data; however, the USDA neither guarantees nor warrants the standard of the product, and the use of the name by USDA implies no approval of the product to the exclusion of others that may also be suitable.

ABSTRACT

The potential of fruit purees as edible mass transfer barriers was studied. Water vapor and oxygen permeabilities (WVP and O2P) of peach puree films were evaluated at different relative humidities (RH) and temperatures (T). Peach puree was not a good water barrier. Peach and apricot films exhibited lower WVPs than pear and apple films. Calcium addition, RH increases and T decreases resulted in increased WVP values for peach puree edible films. WVPs of peach films were compared with other edible and synthetic films. Peach puree films were good oxygen barriers. RH increases resulted in exponential increases in O2P. Most edible and many synthetic polymers showed higher O2Ps at equivalent conditions.

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