Citrus Tissue Extracts Affect Juice Cloud Stability

Authors

  • RANDALL G. CAMERON,

    1. The authors are with the USDA, ARS, South Atlantic Area, Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory, 600 Avenue S, N.W. (P.O. Box 1909), Winter Haven, FL 33883-1909.
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  • ROBERT A. BAKER,

    1. The authors are with the USDA, ARS, South Atlantic Area, Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory, 600 Avenue S, N.W. (P.O. Box 1909), Winter Haven, FL 33883-1909.
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  • KAREL GROHMANN

    1. The authors are with the USDA, ARS, South Atlantic Area, Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory, 600 Avenue S, N.W. (P.O. Box 1909), Winter Haven, FL 33883-1909.
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ABSTRACT

Salt extractable proteins were isolated from hand expressed juice, rag and peel of Valencia oranges. Each tissue extract was divided into dialysis supernatant (DS) and precipitate (DP) (forms during dialysis). DP, DS and DS heated for 2 min at 80°C (HDS) were added to pasteurized, reconstituted frozen concentrated orange juice at 5 U · mL−1 of pectinmethylesterase. Samples were incubated either at 25°C for 14 days or 4°C for 28 days and periodically sampled to determine the effects of tissue extracts on juice cloud stability. Tissue specific differences were observed for the rate of juice cloud precipitation and among the HDS, DS, and DP fractions of a given tissue. HDS fractions destabilized juice cloud more rapidly than DS or DP at both 25 and 4°C.

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