Soybean Flour Lipoxygenase Isozymes Effects on Wheat Flour Dough Rheological and Breadmaking Properties

Authors

  • B. CUMBEE,

    1. Authors Cumbee and Addo are affiliated with the Dept. of Nutrition & Food Science, and author Hildebrand is with the Dept. of Agronomy, Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506. Direct inquires to Dr. K. Addo.
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  • D.F. HILDEBRAND,

    1. Authors Cumbee and Addo are affiliated with the Dept. of Nutrition & Food Science, and author Hildebrand is with the Dept. of Agronomy, Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506. Direct inquires to Dr. K. Addo.
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  • K. ADDO

    1. Authors Cumbee and Addo are affiliated with the Dept. of Nutrition & Food Science, and author Hildebrand is with the Dept. of Agronomy, Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506. Direct inquires to Dr. K. Addo.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Based on a paper presented at the 1995 Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technol ogists, Anaheim, CA, June 3–7, 1995.

  • From a thesis submitted by B. Cumbee to the Academic Faculty of Univ. of Kentucky in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Science.

ABSTRACT

The effects of soy flour from LOX null mutant isolines and purified LOX isozymes on the rheological and breadmaking properties of a commercial hard wheat flour were investigated. Wheat flours were fortified with either 3% soy mutant flours alone, or in the presence of 0.2% and 1% linoleic acid. Purified LOX 2 isozyme had the greatest effect among LOX isozymes on dough extensibility and strength. Linoleic acid substrate addition reduced dough extensibility and strength. The L2L3 null isoline mutant for L1 resulted in the largest increase in bread volume. A reduction in bread firmness occurred after 5 day storage for all three single null mutant-containing samples in the presence of 1.0% linoleic acid substrate.

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