Taste Qualities of Reduced-Sodium Soups as Affected by Serving Temperature

Authors

  • TERRI R. ROSETT,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801. Direct inquiries to Dr. Barbara P. Klein.
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  • TERESA HAMILL,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801. Direct inquiries to Dr. Barbara P. Klein.
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  • KAREN MORRIS,

    1. The authors are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801. Direct inquiries to Dr. Barbara P. Klein.
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  • BARBARA P. KLEIN

    1. The authors are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801. Direct inquiries to Dr. Barbara P. Klein.
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  • This work was supported by Campbell Soup Co., Camden, NJ, and the Midwest Advanced Food Manufacturing Alliance (MAFMA), Lincoln, NE. One author (T.R.R.) received the Rose Marie Pangborn Sensory Scholarship for 1993–1994.

ABSTRACT

Reduced-sodium chicken broths (144 mg Na+ and 288 mg Na+/240 mL serving) were thickened with commonly used food ingredients (four gums, two starches and flour). Salt taste of most soups was stable to temperature change(room, 22°C vs serving, 60–65°C) as judged by 12 subjects. However, soups made with potato starch (144 mg Na+) and ionic xanthan and sodium carboxymethylcellulose gums (288 mg Na+) were saltier at room than at serving temperature. Salt taste enhanced chicken and overall flavors. Soups prepared with all-purpose wheat flour remained unchanged in viscosity, but other soups were perceived as thicker at room temperature.

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