Fermentation and Properties of Calcium-fortified Soy Milk Yogurt

Authors

  • F. YAZICI,

    1. Authors Alvarez and Yazici are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science Nutrition, The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210. Author Hansen is with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Makerere Univ., Kampala, Uganda. Address inquiries to Dr. V.B. Alvarez.
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  • V.B. ALVAREZ,

    1. Authors Alvarez and Yazici are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science Nutrition, The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210. Author Hansen is with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Makerere Univ., Kampala, Uganda. Address inquiries to Dr. V.B. Alvarez.
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  • P.M.T. HANSEN

    1. Authors Alvarez and Yazici are affiliated with the Dept. of Food Science Nutrition, The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH 43210. Author Hansen is with the Dept. of Food Science & Technology, Makerere Univ., Kampala, Uganda. Address inquiries to Dr. V.B. Alvarez.
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  • This paper was presented in part or whole at the Annual Meeting of the Institute of Food Technologists, New Orleans, Louisiana, June 22–26, 1996.

  • F. Yazici acknowledges a fellowship from the Turkish Ministry of Higher Education. Salaries and research support provided by state and federal funds appropriated to the Ohio Agricultural Research & Development Center, The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, Ohio.

ABSTRACT

Calcium-fortified soy milk yogurt containing 190 mg calcium/100g was produced and evaluated for textural and microstructural properties. The soy milk base contained 10% full fat soy flour, 2.25% soy protein isolate, 2.75% high fructose corn syrup, 1.55% calcium lactogluconate, and 1.25% potassium citrate. The mixture was heated 5 min at 80°C, cooled to 42°C, and inoculated with yogurt cultures. Calcium-fortified soy milk required a higher rate of inoculation (5%) than non-fortified soy milk (2.5%) and had higher titratable acidity and more syneresis. Calciumfortified soy milk yogurts showed comparable gel strength with that of commercial regular yogurt. Gels from nonfortified soy milk yogurts were hard and brittle. Addition of calcium did not significantly affect microstructure of the yogurts.

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