Corn Alkaline Cooking Properties Related to Grain Characteristics and Viscosity (RVA)

Authors

  • H.D. ALMEIDA-DOMINGUEZ,

    1. The authors are, respectively, Research Associate, Graduate Research Assistant and Professor, Cereal Quality Laboratory, Soil & Crops Sciences Dept., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2474.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • E.L. SUHENDRO,

    1. The authors are, respectively, Research Associate, Graduate Research Assistant and Professor, Cereal Quality Laboratory, Soil & Crops Sciences Dept., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2474.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • L.W. ROONEY

    1. The authors are, respectively, Research Associate, Graduate Research Assistant and Professor, Cereal Quality Laboratory, Soil & Crops Sciences Dept., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2474.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This study was partially funded by the Snack Food Association, Alexandria, VA and the Texas Corn Producers Association, Dimmitt, TX.

ABSTRACT

The relationship between kernel properties and alkaline cooking characteristics of 14 corn cultivars with different kernel characteristics was evaluated. Corn hardness was measured by abrasion (TADD), flotation, subjective ratings and a viscometric technique (RVA). Hard corn required longer time for cooking as both cooking and steeping hydration rates were lower compared to soft corn. RVA viscosity measurements were correlated with hardness from TADD, flotation and subjective tests, and alkaline cooking parameters. The rate of water uptake during simmering was correlated with RVA viscosity slope. Hard corn endosperm particles consistently required longer time for hydration and gelatinization of starch to develop viscosity. RVA data complemented flotation hardness data to predict cooking properties. RVA could be used as a model to predict cooking properties of corn.

Ancillary