Survival and Growth of Salmonella hadar on Minimally Processed Cabbage as Influenced by Storage Abuse Conditions

Authors

  • ANDREA M. PIAGENTINI,

    1. The authors are affiliated with Instituto de Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Casilla de Correo 266, 3000 Santa Fe, Argentina.
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  • MARiA E. PIROVANI,

    1. The authors are affiliated with Instituto de Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Casilla de Correo 266, 3000 Santa Fe, Argentina.
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  • DANIEL R. GÜEMES,

    1. The authors are affiliated with Instituto de Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Casilla de Correo 266, 3000 Santa Fe, Argentina.
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  • JORGE H. DI PENTIMA,

    1. The authors are affiliated with Instituto de Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Casilla de Correo 266, 3000 Santa Fe, Argentina.
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  • MARiA A. TESSI

    1. The authors are affiliated with Instituto de Tecnología de Alimentos, Facultad de Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Casilla de Correo 266, 3000 Santa Fe, Argentina.
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  • This study was supported in part by CAI+D of Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Santa Fe - Argentina). We gratefully acknowledge the technical assistance of Tec. María A. Moguilevsky.

ABSTRACT

Shredded, washed and centrifuged cabbage was packaged in monooriented polypropylene (OPP) bags, inoculated with Salmonella hadar and stored 10 days at 4°C, 12°C and 20°C. Microbiological, appearance, odor and headspace gas analysis were evaluated throughout storage. S. hadar and mesophilic aerobic and psychrotrophic microorganism growth was affected by storage time and temperature. S. hadar counts were lower (p<0.05) at 4°C than at 12°C and 20°C. The score ratings for general appearance, wilting, browning and off-odor showed that all samples were commercially acceptable. Results indicated that S. hadar could survive and proliferate on minimally processed cabbage, thereby posing a potential hazard to consumers.

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