Reduction of Fluid Loss from Grapefruit Segments with Wax Microemulsion Coatings

Authors

  • ROBERT A. BAKER,

    1. Authors Baker and Hagenmaier are affiliated with U.S. Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory the USDA, ARS, South Atlantic Area, P.O. Box 1909, Winter Haven, FL 33883-1909.
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  • ROBERT D. HAGENMAIER

    1. Authors Baker and Hagenmaier are affiliated with U.S. Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory the USDA, ARS, South Atlantic Area, P.O. Box 1909, Winter Haven, FL 33883-1909.
    Search for more papers by this author

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ABSTRACT

Fresh whole peeled grapefruit or segments produced by vacuum infusion with pectinases are considered minimally processed products. When dry packed, segments from mature late season fruit had fluid losses >15% during 4 wk storage. Edible wax microemulsion coatings reduced leakage of dry-packed segments by 80% after 2 wk, and 64% after 4 wk storage, and were optimally effective in reducing leakage when diluted to 12% solids. Coatings could be made with polyethylene, candelilla or carnauba wax, and with lauric, stearic, palmitic, oleic or myristic acids. Coatings with carnauba wax were most effective. Whether made with morpholine or ammonia as the base, coatings were not detected by informal taste panels before or after storage.

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