High-Pressure-Freezing Effects on Textural Quality of Carrots

Authors

  • MICHIKO FUCHIGAMI,

    1. Authors Fuchigami, Kato (formerly) and Teramoto are with the Dept. of Nutritional Science, Faculty of Health & Welfare Science, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-11, Japan.
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  • NORIKO KATO,

    1. Authors Fuchigami, Kato (formerly) and Teramoto are with the Dept. of Nutritional Science, Faculty of Health & Welfare Science, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-11, Japan.
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  • AI TERAMOTO

    1. Authors Fuchigami, Kato (formerly) and Teramoto are with the Dept. of Nutritional Science, Faculty of Health & Welfare Science, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja, Okayama 719-11, Japan.
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  • A part of this work was supported by the Grant-in Aid for Scientific Research (C) from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture in Japan.

ABSTRACT

Raw or 3 min blanched carrots were pressurized for 45 min at −18°C ∼–20°C and then thawed at 20°C. When carrots were frozen at 100Mpa (ice I), firmness decreased and strain increased. Textural values of carrots pressurized at 200MPa (liquid), 340MPa (ice III), 400MPa (ice V) at ca. –20°C were acceptable. When pressure was increased above 500MPa, the strain increased. Release of pectin and histological damage in carrots pressurized at 200, 340 and 400MPa were less than carrots frozen at 100 and 700MPa (ice VI). After pressurization at 200 and 340MPa at —20°C, carrots were stored in a freezer (–30°C). Firmness decreased and strain increased, but textural values were higher and histological structure were more intact than those frozen at –30°C (0.1MPa) then stored. Thus, high-pressure-freezing at 200, 340 and 400MPa appeared to be effective in improving both the texture and histological structure of frozen carrots.

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