Growth Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by Sodium Polyphosphate as Affected by Polyvalent Metal Ions

Authors

  • LAURA L. ZAIKA,

    1. Authors Zaika, Scullen, and Fanelli are affiliated with the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 19038.
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  • O. JOSEPH SCULLEN,

    1. Authors Zaika, Scullen, and Fanelli are affiliated with the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 19038.
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  • JOSEPH S. FANELLI

    1. Authors Zaika, Scullen, and Fanelli are affiliated with the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 E. Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 19038.
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  • Presented at the 82nd Annual Meeting of the International Association of Milk, Food and Environmental Sanitarians, Pittsburgh, PA, July 30 - August 2, 1995.

ABSTRACT

Sodium polyphosphate (SPP, average chain length = 13) increased the lag time of L. monocytogenes Scott A (Lm) in brain-heart infusion broth (BHI). Polyvalent metal ions (1–10 mM) reversed inhibition of Lm growth by 0.5% SPP (nominal 3.6 mM). 10 mM Ca2+ or Mg2+, 5 mM Fe3+, 2 mM Mn2+ or 1 mM Zn2+ added to SPP-containing BHI, pH 6.0, at 19°C resulted in growth comparable to control cultures. Fe2+ partially restored growth; Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+ or Al3+ were ineffective. SPP inhibited growth at 28°C in BHI, pH 5.0, and Lm grew upon addition of Ca2+, Mg2+ or Mn2+, but not Zn2+ or Fe3+. Addition of 0.5% SPP to mineral-rich foods, such as pureed beef, green beans or sweet potatoes, did not delay growth.

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