Sugars and Free Amino Acids in Stored Russet Burbank Potatoes Treated with CIPC and Alternative Sprout Inhibitors

Authors

  • J. Yang,

    1. Authors Yang, Powers and Welter are with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA 99164-6376.
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  • J.R. Powers,

    Corresponding author
    1. Authors Yang, Powers and Welter are with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA 99164-6376.
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  • T.D. Boylston,

    1. Author Boylston, formerly with Washington State Univ., is currently with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Iowa State Univ., Ames IA 50011.
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  • K.M. Weller

    1. Authors Yang, Powers and Welter are with the Dept. of Food Science & Human Nutrition, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA 99164-6376.
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  • This research was supported by USDA-NRI grant 94-37500-0745. Additional support came from SunSpiced, Inc.

Address inquiries to Dr. J.R. Powers.

ABSTRACT

Glucose, fructose, sucrose and free amino acids were measured in stored Russet Burbank potatoes treated with sprout inhibitors isopropyl-N-(3-chlorophenyl) carbamate (CIPC), 1,4-dimethylnaphthalene (DMN), cineole and salicylaldehyde. Storage effects on sugar and amino acid contents were dependent on the specific sprout inhibitor. Salicylaldehyde treatment (200 ppm) produced a rapid increase of reducing sugar content and a greater amount of free amino acids than other treatments. A smaller amount of tyrosine was found in DMN (40 ppm) treated tubers compared to all other treatments. After 16 wk at 7°C, all potatoes treated with inhibitors had 10.5–11.8 mg/g dry weight reducing sugar content which would be considered acceptable for French fry processing.

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