Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Foods at High Pressure

Authors

  • S. Denys,

    1. Authors Denys and Hendrickx are affiliated with the Laboratory of Food Technology, Dept. of Food & Microbial Technology, Faculty of Agricultural & Applied Biological Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kardinaal Mercierlaan 92, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M.E. Hendrickx

    Corresponding author
    1. Authors Denys and Hendrickx are affiliated with the Laboratory of Food Technology, Dept. of Food & Microbial Technology, Faculty of Agricultural & Applied Biological Sciences, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kardinaal Mercierlaan 92, B-3001 Heverlee, Belgium.
      Address inquiries to Dr. M.E. Hendrickx.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This research was supported by the Flemish Institute for the Promotion of Scientific-Technological Research in Industry (IWT; grant 971133).

Address inquiries to Dr. M.E. Hendrickx.

ABSTRACT

The line heat source probe method, widely used for determining thermal conductivity of food materials, was applied in a pilot scale high-pressure unit and the possibility of extending this technique to pressures up to 400 MPa was investigated. Commercially canned tomato paste and apple pulp were used as test products. Probes were calibrated to 1.5% agar gel. A probe specific pressure- and temperature-dependant calibration factor was applied. The accuracy at high-pressure was similar to published values. Given the simplicity of the method, this approach seems very promising for determining thermal conductivity of foods over a range of pressures and temperatures.

Ancillary