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Antioxidant and Antimutagenic Activity of Dietary Chlorophyll Derivatives Determined by Radical Scavenging and Bacterial Reverse Mutagenesis Assays

Authors

  • M.G. Ferruzzi,

    1. 1Authors Courtney and Schwartz are with the Dept. of Food Science and Tech- I nology, The Ohio State Univ., 108Parker Food Science Bldg., 2016 Fyffe Court, I Columbus, OH 43210. Author Böhm is with the Institute of Nutrition, I Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena, Jena, Germany. Author Ferruzziis withNestlé I Research and Development, 809 Collins Ave., Marysville, OH 43040. Direct I inquiries to author Schwartz (Email: Schwartz.177@osu.edu).
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  • V. Böhm,

    1. 1Authors Courtney and Schwartz are with the Dept. of Food Science and Tech- I nology, The Ohio State Univ., 108Parker Food Science Bldg., 2016 Fyffe Court, I Columbus, OH 43210. Author Böhm is with the Institute of Nutrition, I Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena, Jena, Germany. Author Ferruzziis withNestlé I Research and Development, 809 Collins Ave., Marysville, OH 43040. Direct I inquiries to author Schwartz (Email: Schwartz.177@osu.edu).
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  • P.D. Courtney,

    1. 1Authors Courtney and Schwartz are with the Dept. of Food Science and Tech- I nology, The Ohio State Univ., 108Parker Food Science Bldg., 2016 Fyffe Court, I Columbus, OH 43210. Author Böhm is with the Institute of Nutrition, I Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena, Jena, Germany. Author Ferruzziis withNestlé I Research and Development, 809 Collins Ave., Marysville, OH 43040. Direct I inquiries to author Schwartz (Email: Schwartz.177@osu.edu).
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  • S.J. Schwartz

    1. 1Authors Courtney and Schwartz are with the Dept. of Food Science and Tech- I nology, The Ohio State Univ., 108Parker Food Science Bldg., 2016 Fyffe Court, I Columbus, OH 43210. Author Böhm is with the Institute of Nutrition, I Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena, Jena, Germany. Author Ferruzziis withNestlé I Research and Development, 809 Collins Ave., Marysville, OH 43040. Direct I inquiries to author Schwartz (Email: Schwartz.177@osu.edu).
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  • The authors thank Ni Luh Puspitasari-Nienab er and Igor Milosevic for their assistance with derivative synthesis, purification, and TEAC assay development. The kind assistance of Julie Jenkins with the antimutagenicity studies is greatly appreciated.

ABSTRACT:

In vitro antioxidant and antimutagenic activity of dietary chlorophyll derivatives was assessed. Antioxidant activity was determined by the ability of each compound to scavenge the long-lived free radicals 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS+). Antimutagenic activity was assayed with a modified microscreen bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay using Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and benzo[a]pyrene as the tester strain and mutagen respectively. Derivatives of chlorophyll a were found to be more effective radical quenchers than those of chlorophyll b. Furthermore, metal-free derivatives such as chlorins, pheophytins, and pyropheophytins exhibited significantly lower antiradical capacity than metallo-derivatives such as Mg-chlorophylls, Zn-pheophytins, Zn-pyropheophytins, Cu-pheophytina, andCu-chlorophyllins. Both metal-free and metallo-chlorophyll derivatives demonstrated similar dose-dependent inhibitory activity against B[a]P induced mutagenesis. These results demonstrate that dietary chlorophyll derivatives prevalent in both fresh and processed foods and dietary supplements have antioxidant and antimutagenic activities.

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