Comparison of the Stability of Pelargonidin-based Anthocyanins in Strawberry Juice and Concentrate

Authors

  • G.A. Garzón,

    1. Author Garzon is with the National Center for Agricultural Utilization, Biomaterials Processing Research, ARS, USDA, Peoria, Ill. and author Wrolstad is with the Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331–6602. Direct inquiries to author Wrolstad (E-mail: ron.wrolstad@orst.edu).
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  • R.E. Wrolstad

    1. Author Garzon is with the National Center for Agricultural Utilization, Biomaterials Processing Research, ARS, USDA, Peoria, Ill. and author Wrolstad is with the Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331–6602. Direct inquiries to author Wrolstad (E-mail: ron.wrolstad@orst.edu).
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  • This investigation was supported by a grant from the Northwest Center for Small Fruit Research. We thank Conroy Packing Inc. for providing fruit. The assistance of Robert W. Durst and Kenneth Stewart in the processing trials is appreciated. Donald A. Griffin of the OSU Department of Chemistry performed the ESMS analyses. This is technical paper number 1 1699 from the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station.

ABSTRACT

Strawberries were processed into juice (8° Brix) and concentrate (65° Brix) and different lots were fortified with pelargonidin 3-glucoside, pelargonidin 3-sophoroside, and acylated pelargonidin 3-sophoroside 5-glucoside. Changes in pigment concentration, color (CIE L*a*b*) and ascorbic acid content were monitored during storage at 25 °C. Anthocyanin and ascorbic acid degradations followed 1st order reaction kinetics. Fortification increased the half-life of the pigments from 3.5 to 5 d in concentrate and from 5 to 12 d in juice. The half-life of ascorbic acid was 2 d in juice samples and ranged from 3 to 10 d in concentrate samples. Both systems showed changes in chroma and hue angle, but maintained L* values.

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