A Novel Technique for Limitation of Acrylamide Formation in Fried and Baked Corn Chips and in French Fries

Authors

  • M.Y. Jung,

    1. Authors Jung and Ju are with the Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Woosuk Univ. Author Choi is with the Dept. of Biotechnology, Woosuk Univ., Samrea, Jeonbuk, 565-701, South Korea. Direct inquiries to author Jung (munjung@woosuk.ac.kr).
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  • D.S. Choi,

    1. Authors Jung and Ju are with the Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Woosuk Univ. Author Choi is with the Dept. of Biotechnology, Woosuk Univ., Samrea, Jeonbuk, 565-701, South Korea. Direct inquiries to author Jung (munjung@woosuk.ac.kr).
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  • J.W. Ju

    1. Authors Jung and Ju are with the Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Woosuk Univ. Author Choi is with the Dept. of Biotechnology, Woosuk Univ., Samrea, Jeonbuk, 565-701, South Korea. Direct inquiries to author Jung (munjung@woosuk.ac.kr).
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: The effects of lowering pH by an acidulant (citric acid) on the formation of acrylamide in fried and baked corn chips and in french fries were studied by using a GC/MS. The 0.2% citric acid treatments induced 82.2% and 72.8% inhibition of acrylamide formation in fried and baked corn chips, respectively. Dipping potato cuts in 1% and 2% citric acid solutions for 1 h before frying showed 73.1% and 79.7% inhibition of acrylamide formation in french fries. In the experiment of heating 1 mL solution containing asparagine and glucose in phosphate buffers, by lowering the pH from 7.0 to 4.0, 99.1% inhibition of acrylamide formation was achieved. This is the first finding of an effective, simple, and practical way to limit the acrylamide formation in real foods.

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