Mercury and Fatty Acids in Canned Tuna, Salmon, and Mackerel

Authors

  • S.M. Shim,

    1. Authors Shim, Lasrado, and Santerre are with Dept. of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue Univ., Stone Hall, 700 W. State St., West Lafayette, IN 47907–2059. Author Dorworth is with Aquatic Ecology Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Program, Purdue Univ.-Calumet, Hammond, Ind. Direct inquiries to author Santerre (E-mail: santerre@purdue.edu).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • L.E. Dorworth,

    1. Authors Shim, Lasrado, and Santerre are with Dept. of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue Univ., Stone Hall, 700 W. State St., West Lafayette, IN 47907–2059. Author Dorworth is with Aquatic Ecology Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Program, Purdue Univ.-Calumet, Hammond, Ind. Direct inquiries to author Santerre (E-mail: santerre@purdue.edu).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J.A. Lasrado,

    1. Authors Shim, Lasrado, and Santerre are with Dept. of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue Univ., Stone Hall, 700 W. State St., West Lafayette, IN 47907–2059. Author Dorworth is with Aquatic Ecology Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Program, Purdue Univ.-Calumet, Hammond, Ind. Direct inquiries to author Santerre (E-mail: santerre@purdue.edu).
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C.R. Santerre

    1. Authors Shim, Lasrado, and Santerre are with Dept. of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue Univ., Stone Hall, 700 W. State St., West Lafayette, IN 47907–2059. Author Dorworth is with Aquatic Ecology Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant Program, Purdue Univ.-Calumet, Hammond, Ind. Direct inquiries to author Santerre (E-mail: santerre@purdue.edu).
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Canned tuna (n = 240), salmon (n = 16), and mackerel (n = 16) were analyzed for mercury and fatty acids. Average mercury levels were 188, 45, and 55 ppb, respectively, and below the FDA Action Level of 1000 ppb. “Light tuna in water” contained lower mercury (x = 54 ppb) compared with “white/albacore tuna in water,” which contained higher eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid (EPA/DHA) x= 711 mg/100 g wet tissue). Mercury residues in salmon (x = 45 ppb) and mackerel (x = 55 ppb) were lower than in tuna products, but the EPA/DHA levels were higher (salmon, ×= 1623 mg/100 g wet tissue; mackerel, ×= 851 mg/100 g wet tissue). Information from this study will help women of childbearing age to limit their intake of mercury while obtaining healthy fats from fish.

Ancillary