Effect of Drying on the Nutraceutical Quality of Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. ssp. sinensis) Leaves

Authors

  • Tiffany T. Y. Guan,

    1. Authors Guan and Hydamak are with Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Author Cenkowski is with Dept. of Biosystems Engineering, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB., Can. R3T 2N2. Direct inquiries to author Cenkowski (Stefan_Cenkowski@umanitoba.ca).
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  • Stefan Cenkowski,

    1. Authors Guan and Hydamak are with Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Author Cenkowski is with Dept. of Biosystems Engineering, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB., Can. R3T 2N2. Direct inquiries to author Cenkowski (Stefan_Cenkowski@umanitoba.ca).
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  • Arnie Hydamaka

    1. Authors Guan and Hydamak are with Dept. of Food Science, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Author Cenkowski is with Dept. of Biosystems Engineering, Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB., Can. R3T 2N2. Direct inquiries to author Cenkowski (Stefan_Cenkowski@umanitoba.ca).
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: The concentrations of total phenolics, carotenoids, and chlorophylls of fresh and dried sea buckthorn leaves were determined. Overall, drying of leaves resulted in a decrease in the concentrations of these phytochemicals. The degree of reduction depended on the drying time, temperature, or specific component type. For the phenolics, a greater reduction in concentration was observed in the leaves dried at higher temperatures (80 °C or 100 °C) for longer times (to equilibrium moisture contents of 1% to 3%) compared with those dried at lower temperatures (50 °C or 60 °C). For the leaves dried to higher final moisture (5% to 8%), all drying temperatures resulted in a similar final phenolic concentration. The carotenoid and chlorophyll concentrations in the leaves decreased with the increasing temperatures. However, higher temperatures such as 80 °C or 100 °C resulted in similar carotenoid and chlorophyll concentrations in the leaves. Nonetheless, dried sea buckthorn leaves were of a high nutraceutical quality comparable to those of frequently consumed vegetables.

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