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Antioxidative and reducing capacity, macroelements content and sensorial properties of buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free bread

Authors

  • Małgorzata Wronkowska,

    Corresponding author
    1.  Division of Food Science, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 10 Tuwima Str, 10-747 Olsztyn, Poland
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  • Danuta Zielińska,

    1.  Faculty of Environmental Management and Agriculture, Department of Chemistry, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Plac Łódzki 4, 10-727 Olsztyn, Poland
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  • Dorota Szawara-Nowak,

    1.  Division of Food Science, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 10 Tuwima Str, 10-747 Olsztyn, Poland
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  • Agnieszka Troszyńska,

    1.  Division of Food Science, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 10 Tuwima Str, 10-747 Olsztyn, Poland
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  • Maria Soral-Śmietana

    1.  Division of Food Science, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 10 Tuwima Str, 10-747 Olsztyn, Poland
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Correspondent: Fax: (48 89) 5240124;
e-mail: m.wronkowska@pan.olsztyn.pl

Summary

Common buckwheat flour (BF) was used to substitute 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of corn starch, the main component of a gluten-free bread formula, to make buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads. The 40% BF-enhanced gluten-free bread showed the highest antioxidant capacity against ABTS+˙ and DPPH˙ radicals (4.1 and 2.5 μmol Trolox g−1 DM, respectively) and reducing capacity measured by cyclic voltammetry (1.5 μmol Trolox g−1 DM). The antioxidant and reducing capacity of buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads were positively correlated with their total phenolic contents (r = 0.97). The 40% BF-enhanced gluten-free bread showed the highest overall sensory quality (7.1 units) when compared to control gluten-free bread (1.8 units). The linear relationship between applied increasing BF doses in gluten-free bread formula and magnesium, phosphorus and potassium content in breads was noted. It was concluded that 40% BF-enhanced gluten-free bread could be developed and dedicated to those people suffering from coeliac disease.

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