Acerola and cashew apple as sources of antioxidants and dietary fibre

Authors

  • Maria do Socorro M. Rufino,

    1.  Federal Rural University of the Semi-Arid, Mossoró-RN, Brazil
    2.  Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute for Food Science and Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN-CSIC), Madrid, Spain
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    • Present address: Food Technology Department, Federal University of Ceara, Av. Mister Hall, 2977, Pici, 60356-000 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil.

  • Jara Pérez-Jiménez,

    1.  Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute for Food Science and Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN-CSIC), Madrid, Spain
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    • Present address: Institute of Advanced Chemistry of Catalonia-CSIC, c/Jordi Girona, 18-26, 08034 Barcelona, Spain.

  • María Tabernero,

    1.  Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute for Food Science and Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN-CSIC), Madrid, Spain
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    • Present address: Experimental Surgery Department, University Hospital La Paz, Paseo de la Castellana, 261, 28046 Madrid, Spain.

  • Ricardo E. Alves,

    Corresponding author
    1.  Postharvest Physiology and Technology Laboratory, Embrapa Tropical Agroindustry, Fortaleza-CE, Brazil
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  • Edy S. De Brito,

    1.  Postharvest Physiology and Technology Laboratory, Embrapa Tropical Agroindustry, Fortaleza-CE, Brazil
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  • Fulgencio Saura-Calixto

    1.  Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute for Food Science and Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN-CSIC), Madrid, Spain
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Correspondent: Fax: (55) 85 3391 7222;
e-mail: elesbao@cnpat.embrapa.br

Summary

Several tropical fruits have been described as natural sources of dietary fibre (DF) and phenolic compounds, associated with different health effects. The aim of this work was to ascertain the DF, phenolic compounds content (including non-extractable polyphenols, mostly associated with DF) and antioxidant capacity in acerola fruits and cashew apples from selected clones. ‘BRS 236’ acerola fruits presented a high antioxidant capacity because of the combination of both extractable polyphenols and l-ascorbic acid (providing together a Folin value of 170 kg−1 g d.m.). ‘CCP 76’ cashew apples contained 28 g kg−1 d.m. of extractable polyphenols and 13 g kg−1 d.m. of ascorbic acid as well as a high amount of non-extractable condensed tannins (52 g kg−1 d.m.). DF content was of 260 g kg−1 d.m. in acerola fruit and of 209 g kg−1 d.m. in cashew apple. Acerola fruits and cashew apple should therefore be considered as new natural sources of DF and phenolic compounds.

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