Teachers of nursing in the United Kingdom: a description of their attitudes*

Authors

  • Vivienne House B.A. M.Phil.,

    1. Research Officer, The General Nursing Council for England and Wales Research Unit, 32 Great Portland Street, London W1N 5AD
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  • Alan Sims B.A. M.Phil.

    1. Acting Director, The General Nursing Council for England and Wales Research Unit, 32 Great Portland Street, London W1N 5AD
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  • *

    The authors would like to point out that the views expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of either the authors or the General Nursing Council (GNC) but represent a summary of comments made by 956 registered teachers of nursing.

Abstract

A survey in which 2923 registered teachers of nursing completed questionnaires produced 956 questionnaires on which teachers provided additional comment about their jobs. Whilst the attitudes of the different types and grades of teacher varied somewhat, there appeared to be a common core of dissatisfaction or concern. All groups in their way expressed concern about a perceived decline in the status of nurse teaching. This decline reduced the amount of control that teachers had over the educational process—reducing numbers of teachers and hence the ability to provide adequate direct teacher-learner contact; the chance to plan and carry out an ordered sequence of educational experiences and the ability to control the total educational function. Possible changes in the future educational structure were viewed with caution as such changes were seen as needing increased resources.

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