Differences in stress perceived by headnurses across nursing specialities in hospitals*

Authors

  • Peggy Leatt B.Sc.N. M.H.S.A.,

    1. Assistant Professor, Division of Health Services Administration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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  • Rodney Schneck Ph.D.

    1. Professor, Department of Organizational Analysis, Faculty of Business Administration and Commerce, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
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  • *

    Funded in part by Canada Council Grant S76-0082, Ottawa and by the J. D. Muir Research Fund, University of Alberta, Edmonton.

  • **At the time of submission, Peggy Leatt (formerly Overton) was a recipient of a National Health Student Fellowship, National Health Research and Development Programme, Ottawa.

Abstract

The main purpose for this research was to specify empirically the sources and frequency of stress experienced by headnurses working in different types of specialities in hospitals. Headnurses (n—153) from nine specialities: paediatrics, obstetrics, medicine, surgery, rural, auxiliary, psychiatry, rehabilitation and intensive care participated. Data were collected by a 21 item questionnaire. Findings suggested five types of stress for headnurses relating to their administrative role, type of patients, task ambiguity, staffing problems and physician contact. Headnurses from different specialities perceived these types of stress to occur with differing frequency.

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