A comparison of frequency and sources of nursing job stress perceived by intensive care, hospice and medical-surgical nurses

Authors


Dr Martha J Foxall University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing 42nd & Dtwey Avenue, Omaha NE68105 USA

Abstract

This study compared the frequency and sources of nursing job stress perceived by 35 intensive care (ICU), 30 hospice and 73 medical-surgical nurses Analysis of variance revealed no significant differences among the three groups of nurses on the overall frequency of job stress Post-hoc Tukey tests demonstrated a significant difference in three stress subscales among the three groups ICU and hospice nurses perceived significantly more stress than medical-surgical nurses related to death and dying, ICU and medical-surgical nurses perceived significantly more stress than hospice nurses related to floating, and medical-surgical nurses perceived significantly more stress than ICU and hospice nurses related to work-overload/staffing Spearman-Rank Correlation revealed no significant correlations among the three groups in their rank-ordering of the eight stress subscales Death and dying situations were the most stressful to ICU and hospice nurses, while work-overload/staffing situations were the most stressful to medical-surgical nurses Results of the study, although not generalizable, have implications for nurse managers

Ancillary