Nurses' perceptions of their problem-solving ability

Authors

  • Anne M Chang RN DipNEd BEdSt(Hons) MEdSt,

    Formerly Senior Lecturer, Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nursing Studies, Queensland Institute of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
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  • Deanne Gaskill Rn BAPPSC(NSG) GRDIPHSC MAPPSC

    Formerly Lecturer
    1. Department of Nursing Studies, Queensland Institute of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
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Mrs AM Chang 3A Residence 15 Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong

Abstract

A problem-solving approach to nursing practice has been advocated in the nursing literature for some time However, the extent to which nurses perceive themselves as capable problem solvers or improve their problem-solving ability during their nursing education is not generally known The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nurses' perceptions of their problem solving ability and their course of study The Problem-Solving Inventory (PSI) was developed by Heppner and colleagues (1982) to assess attitudes towards and perceptions of problem-solving behaviour The instrument provides a global appraisal of oneself as a problem solver and assesses perceptions of problem solving ability In this study, data were collected from 67 pre and post registration nursing students in two phases, during their course and on completion of their course Data from each phase were compared to identify changes in perception of problem-solving behaviour over time While there was no overall improvement in perceptions of problem-solving ability by phase 2, confidence in problem solving had improved significantly (P<0 01) There were improvements according to age, experience, and course being undertaken for the likelihood of approaching rather than avoiding problems, and having personal control over problem solving

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