Criteria for evaluating the clinical and practical utility of models used by nurses

Authors

  • Desmond FS Cormack RMN RGN MPhil DipEd PhD DipN,

    Honorary Reader in Health and Nursing, Corresponding author
    1. Queen Margaret College, Edinburgh
      Dr DFS Cormack Honorary Reader Department of Health and Nursing Queen Margaret College Clerwood Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 8TS Scotland
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  • William Reynolds RMN RNT RGN MPhil

    Senior Tutor
    1. Highland College of Nursing and Midwifery, Inverness, Scotland
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Dr DFS Cormack Honorary Reader Department of Health and Nursing Queen Margaret College Clerwood Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 8TS Scotland

Abstract

Arguably, nursing, like all health care disciplines, is an applied science Essentially, this refers to the application of theory in order to understand and respond to the health problems of clients These theories may be drawn (borrowed) from any applied science, or generated inductively from clinical nursing practice Alternatively, nurses may attempt to apply deductive theory (global theoretical frameworks) known as nursing models In this paper, all theoretical approaches, irrespective of origin, are referred to as models used by nurses Thirteen criteria by which clinicians, and others, can evaluate the clinical and practical utility of models used by nurses which are expressed in the form of questions are identified and discussed The criteria are an extension, both in detail and in number, of those developed by Reynolds and Cormack and subsequently applied by those writers to the Johnson Behavioural System Model of Nursing The value, or otherwise, of individual models, or of models in general, will not be discussed in this paper However, the authors propose that if the evaluation criteria described here are applied to existing models, serious deficits will be identified in relation to their clinical and practical utility

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