An application of nursing faculty practice: clinical camps

Authors

  • David Arthur RN BAppSc BEd Studies MEd Studies,

    Corresponding author
    1. Senior Lecturer and Head of Department, Department of Community and Mental Health Nursing, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales
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  • Kim Usher RN DNE DHS BA

    1. Lecturer, Department of Nursing Sciences James Cook University of North Queensland Townsville, Queensland, Australia
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David Arthur, Senior Lecturer and Head of Department, Department of Community and Mental Health Nursing, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Cullaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.

Abstract

The incorporation of clinical practice into nursing faculty role expectations has triggered much debate. Despite the urge for the incorporation of practice into faculty roles, past research has demonstrated that the majority of faculties do not in fact include clinical practice. Reasons given for the failure of nurse academics to practice include lack of time, the failure of academia to value the practice, and the failure to include the practice as criteria for tenure and promotion. For faculty practice to occur it has been argued that clinical practice needs to be more a matter of individual intent: adaptable, and creative. Clinical camps provide potential opportunities for clinical practice for faculties. These camps, it is argued, offer the possibility of clinical teaching, promotion of collegial relationships between faculty and health care agencies, development of positive faculty-student relationships, and a valuable research site. For this reason, it is argued that clinical camps be considered a viable venue for faculty practice.

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