Breastfeeding duration: prenatal intentions and postnatal practices

Authors

  • Kerryann Lawson BA Grad Dip Counselling,

    1. Family Services Officer, Department of Family Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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  • Marian I Tulloch BA MEd PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. Senior Lecturer in Psychology, School of Social Sciences and Liberal Studies, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia
      Dr M Tulloch, School of Social Sciences and Liberal Studies Charles Sturt University, Bathurst NSW 2795, Australia
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Dr M Tulloch, School of Social Sciences and Liberal Studies Charles Sturt University, Bathurst NSW 2795, Australia

Abstract

A study of 78 primiparas examined the role of prenatal intent and postnatal experiences in breastfeeding duration Those fully breastfeeding 3 months after the birth of the baby had a higher level of education, timed their decision to breastfeed earlier, intended to breastfeed longer and had a more negative attitude to formula feeding Commitment and confidence scores were not related to breastfeeding duration in first-tune mothers Breastfeeding duration was also related to the timing of the first breastfeed and extent of mother-infant contact in the 72 hours after birth but not to the number of feeding problems

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