A Heideggerian hermeneutic study of the practice of critical care nurses

Authors

  • Allan John Walters RN PhD FRCNA

    Corresponding author
    1. Honorary Researcher (Nursing), Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Sydney, and Head, Department of Medical, Surgical and Paediatric Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Western Sydney Nepean, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia
      Dr A J Walters Head Department of Medical, Surgical and Paediatnc Nursing Faculty of Nursing and Health Studies University of Western Sydney Nepean, PO Box 10 Kingswood NSW 2747 Australia
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Dr A J Walters Head Department of Medical, Surgical and Paediatnc Nursing Faculty of Nursing and Health Studies University of Western Sydney Nepean, PO Box 10 Kingswood NSW 2747 Australia

Abstract

This study provides a Heideggerian analysis of the practice of eight critical care nurses who work in an Australian intensive care unit Specifically, it describes two themes that emerged from a larger study on expert critical care nursing practice These themes are referred to as ‘balancing’ and ‘being busy’ Each theme emerged with several foci The theme ‘balancing’ is concerned with the ability of the nurse to manage simultaneously the paradoxical relationship between the technology of the intensive care unit and the processes of care ‘Being busy’ was a theme that recognized the technical nature of critical care nursing The paper concludes with a discussion of the relevant Heideggerian philosophical concepts

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