Models of differentiated practice and specialization in community nursing: a review of the literature

Authors

  • Patrick GM Jansen MSc RN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Fellow, Department of Nursing and Caring Research, Netherlands Institute of Primary Health Care (NIVEL), Utrecht, and Management Consultant, Hoeksma Homans & Mentmg, Enschede
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  • Ada Kerkstra PhD,

    1. Senior Research Fellow, Department of Nursing and Caring Research, Netherlands Institute of Primary Health Care (NIVEL), Utrecht
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  • Huda Huijer Abu-Saad PhD,

    1. Professor, Department of Nursing Science, University of Limburg, Maastricht
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  • Jouke van der Zee PhD

    1. Professor and Director, Netherlands Institute of Primary Health Care (NIVEL), Utrecht, and Chair of Primary Health Care Research, Department of Medical Sociology, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Dr P G M Jansen, Tulpstraat 29 7555 BS Hengelo The Netherlands

Abstract

In most agencies for community nursing at least two types of nurse are employed To ensure efficient use of personnel and high quality of nursing care, the principles of differentiated practice and specialization are used It is suggested that these types of work redesign will have consequences for nurses and then1 work We made a review of the literature to see how these principles are used and then: effects on job satisfaction, burnout and quality of care This review provides several views and descriptions of nursing activities, but it also shows that there is a paucity of quantitative data about the effects of differentiated practice and specialization in community nursing To study these effects more systematically, a research model is presented This model makes it possible to describe the changes in job characteristics caused by differentiated practice and specialization Secondly, it allows the effects on job satisfaction, burnout and quality of care to be studied

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