Get access

A nurse- and pharmacist-led treatment advice clinic for patients attending an HIV outpatient clinic

Authors

  • C. Griffiths,

    1. Catherine Griffiths BSc MSc Research Fellow Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research, Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. Miles,

    1. Kevin Miles MSc PhD RN Lead Clinician for GUM Services Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research, Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK and Mortimer Market Centre, Camden PCT, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. Aldam,

    1. Diana Aldam RN Research Nurse Mortimer Market Centre, Camden PCT, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. Cornforth,

    1. David Cornforth RN
      Research Nurse Mortimer Market Centre, Camden PCT, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. Minton,

    1. Simon Edwards MBChB FRCP Consultant in GU Medicine
      Mortimer Market Centre, Camden PCT, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. Edwards,

    1. June Minton BPharm MRPharmS
      Lead Pharmacist HIV/GUM and Infectious Diseases University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Pharmacy Department, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • I. Williams

    1. Ian Williams BSc MBChB FRCP Senior Lecturer and Honorary Consultant Physician Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research, Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK and Mortimer Market Centre, Camden PCT, London, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Catherine Griffiths: e-mail: cgriffiths@gum.ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study to map care pathways, examine the approach of different treatment advisors and explore the acceptability of a nurse- and pharmacist-led treatment advice clinic in order to aid decision-making for the future development and evaluation of the clinic.

Background.  High levels of adherence to antiretroviral drugs are a prerequisite for a successful and durable virological and immunological response to HIV. Treatment guidelines acknowledge that adherence is a process, not a single event, and that adherence support must be integrated into clinical follow-up for all patients receiving these drugs.

Method.  Data were collected between September 2004 and January 2005 through 17 consultation observations and 10 patient interviews in a specialist treatment advice clinic located within a central London HIV outpatient clinic providing care for over 2200 patients, of whom more than 1300 are taking highly active antiretroviral therapy.

Findings.  The nurses and pharmacist had similar consultation approaches, although follow-up care varied in extent. Benefits of the clinic approach included permitting patients to observe real tablets, tailoring regimens to lifestyles and telephone follow-up. These factors, particularly telephone support, were perceived by patients to assist with adherence.

Conclusion.  The role of telephone support, perceived to assist with initial adherence, requires further investigation. Future work is also needed to explore the health economics of this approach and to determine the actual impact of the clinic on clinical and adherence outcomes.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary