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Resilience in the operating room: developing and testing of a resilience model

Authors

  • Brigid M. Gillespie,

    1. Brigid M. Gillespie BSc RN Lecturer School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Gold Coast,Queensland, Australia
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  • Wendy Chaboyer,

    1. Wendy Chaboyer BN MN PhD RN Professor & Director Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
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  • Marianne Wallis,

    1. Marianne Wallis BSc PhD RN Professor & Chair Clinical Nursing Research, Griffith University Research Centre for Clinical Practice Innovation & Gold Coast, Health Service District, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
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  • Peter Grimbeek

    1. Peter Grimbeek BA PhD Senior Lecturer School of Cognition, Language, and Special Education, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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B.M. Gillespie: e-mail: b.gillespie@griffith.edu.au

Abstract

Title. Resilience in the operating room: developing and testing of a resilience model

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study to examine the relation of perceived competence, collaboration, control, self-efficacy, hope, coping, age, experience, education and years of employment to resilience in operating room (OR) nurses.

Background.  Resilience is viewed as a vital attribute for nurses because it augments adaptation in demanding and volatile clinical environments such as ORs. However, there has been little research into the utility of resilience as a means of dealing with workplace stress, and there is only limited understanding of variables that explain resilience in the context of nursing.

Method.  A correlational cross-sectional survey design was used. Of a national sample of 2860 Australian OR nurses, 1430 were selected by systematic random sampling and invited to complete a questionnaire in 2006. The instrument included scales measuring perceived competence, collaboration, control, self-efficacy, hope, coping and resilience, and gathered information about the demographic characteristics of respondents.

Results.  Two regression models were used to develop a model of resilience. An initial model tested the hypothesis that a set of 12 explanatory variables contributed to resilience in OR nurses. Five variables (hope, self-efficacy, coping, control and competence) explained resilience at statistically significant levels. Age, experience, education and years of employment did not contribute to resilience at statistically significant levels. The final model explained 60% of the variance. In both models, the strongest explanatory variables were hope, self-efficacy and coping.

Conclusion.  Identification of explanatory variables that contribute to resilience in ORs may assist in implementing strategies that promote these behaviours, and thus retain nurses in this specialty.

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