Get access

Self-worth therapy for depressive symptoms in older nursing home residents

Authors

  • Yun-Fang Tsai,

    1. Yun-Fang Tsai PhD RN Professor School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, and Associate Director Department of Nursing, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kee-Long, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Thomas K.S. Wong,

    1. Thomas K.S. Wong PhD RN Chair and Professor School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hsiu-Hsin Tsai,

    1. Hsiu-Hsin Tsai MS RN Instructor School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Yan-Chiou Ku

    1. Yan-Chiou Ku PhD RN Associate Director Nursing Department, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, and Assistant Professor School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author

Y.-F. Tsai: e-mail: yftsai@mail.cgu.edu.tw

Abstract

Title. Self-worth therapy for depressive symptoms in older nursing home residents.

Aim.  The aim of this study is to report the effects of self-worth therapy on depressive symptoms of older nursing home residents.

Background.  Depression in older people has become a serious healthcare issue worldwide. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies have been shown to have inconsistent effects, and drug treatment can have important side-effects.

Method.  A quasi-experimental design was used. Older people were sampled by convenience from residents of a nursing home in northern Taiwan between 2005 and 2006. To be included in the study participants had to: (i) have no severe cognitive deficits; (ii) test positive for depressive status and (iii) take the same anti-depressant medication in the previous 3 months and throughout the study. Participants in the experimental group (n = 31) received 30 minutes of one-to-one self-worth therapy on 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Control group participants (n = 32) received no therapy, but were individually visited by the same research assistant, who chatted with them for 30 minutes on 1 day/week for 4 weeks. Depressive status, cognitive status and functional status were measured at baseline, immediately after the intervention and 2 months later. Data were analysed by mean, standard deviations, t-test, chi-squared test and univariate anova.

Findings.  Self-worth therapy immediately decreased depressive symptoms relative to baseline, but not relative to control treatment. However, 2 months later, depressive symptoms were statistically significantly reduced relative to control.

Conclusion.  Self-worth therapy is an easily-administered, effective, non-pharmacological treatment with potential for decreasing depressive symptoms in older nursing home residents.

Ancillary