Being a personal preceptor for nursing students: Registered Nurses’ experiences before and after introduction of a preceptor model

Authors


K. Hallin: e-mail: karin.hallin@miun.se

Abstract

Title. Being a personal preceptor for nursing students: Registered Nurses’ experiences before and after introduction of a preceptor model.

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study to compare Registered Nurses’ experiences of acting as personal preceptors for nursing students in the year 2000 with the year 2006 and explores relationships between preceptors’ experiences and personal/clinical characteristics.

Background.  Preceptoring is experienced as stressful and challenging. How successful preceptors are in this role depends largely on the support they receive. Knowledge about preceptors’ experiences over time and in relation to a preceptor model is limited.

Method.  Data were collected by questionnaire in 2000 (n = 113) and 2006 (n = 109) with preceptor groups in a hospital in Sweden before and after introduction of a preceptor model. Data were analysed with descriptive and correlational statistics using parametric and non-parametric methods.

Findings.  Statistically significant improvements were noted in preceptors’ experiences between 2000 and 2006. Statistically significantly more preceptors in 2006 reported that they felt prepared for their role and felt support from teachers, colleagues, chief nurses and enrolled nurses. Least improvement was seen in relation to the questionnaire items workload, constructive feedback and support in linking research results to practice. A strong positive relationship existed between preceptors’ experiences of the preceptor role and the level of interest in preceptoring.

Conclusion.  The preceptor model offers a way to support and facilitate preceptors and to develop co-operation between university and hospital. Future research should focus on students’ experiences, experiences of first-time preceptors, head preceptors and teachers from a longitudinal perspective.

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