Bone mineral density and perceived menopausal symptoms: factors influencing low back pain in postmenopausal women

Authors


R. Song: e-mail: songry@cnu.ac.kr

Abstract

Title. Bone mineral density and perceived menopausal symptoms: factors influencing low back pain in postmenopausal women.

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study of the relationships between the factors influencing low back pain in postmenopausal women (i.e. menopausal symptoms, bone mineral density, duration of menopause, hormonal therapy, obesity, inactivity during leisure time, parity, osteoarthritis and drinking coffee).

Background.  Previous studies have shown that low back pain in postmenopausal women is associated with bone mineral density, menopausal symptoms and lifestyle factors, yet the factors influencing low back pain are not clear and vary with ethnicity.

Method.  A survey was conducted with postmenopausal women (= 134) in Korea in 2006. Bone mineral density in the lumbar spine, back pain status, menopausal symptoms and health habits were assessed.

Results.  Participants’ mean age was 59 years. About 70% experienced back pain on more than 1 day during the week prior to the survey and 35% suffered back pain daily. Women with back pain reported more severe menopausal symptoms than those without back pain. Based on bone mineral density scores, 26·9% of the women were considered to be at risk of osteoporosis. However, there was no association between back pain status and fracture risk status. Based on a multiple logistic regression model, menopausal symptoms, drinking coffee and inactivity during leisure time were statistically significant influencing factors for low back pain in this sample.

Conclusion.  The prevalence of low back pain in postmenopausal women should be recognized in association with menopausal symptoms and health habits. Further research is needed to develop interventions for the management of low back pain in postmenopausal women.

Ancillary