Occupational stress among hospital nurses: cross-sectional survey

Authors

  • Hui Wu,

    1. Hui Wu PhD Associate Professor Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China
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  • Tie-Shuang Chi,

    1. Tie-Shuang Chi MD Assistant Professor Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China
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  • Li Chen,

    1. Li Chen MD Assistant Professor Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China
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  • Lie Wang,

    1. Lie Wang MD Professor Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China
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  • Ya-Ping Jin

    1. Ya-Ping Jin MD PhD Professor Department of Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, China
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Y.-P. Jin: e-mail: jinyp@mail.cmu.edu.cn

Abstract

wu h., chi t.-s., chen l., wang l. & jin y.-p. (2010) Occupational stress among hospital nurses: cross-sectional survey. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(3), 627–634.

Abstract

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore factors associated with occupational stress among female hospital nurses in China.

Background.  Nursing is a highly stressful occupation, and high levels of occupational stress are believed to affect the physical and mental health of nurses. Occupational stress among nurses is the result of exposure to a combination of working environment and personal factors.

Method.  A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008. The study population consisted of 2613 female nurses from 20 hospitals in the Liaoning province of China. Occupational stress was measured by questionnaires that included the Chinese version of Personal Strain Questionnaire, and data were collected on respondents’ demographics, working situations, occupational roles, and personal resources. Of the nurses solicited for enrolment in the study, 79·2% returned the completed questionnaire. A general linear regression model was applied to analyse the factors associated with occupational stress.

Results.  Mean Personal Strain Questionnaire score was 86·9, and this score was correlated, in descending order of standardized estimate, with role boundary, role insufficiency, responsibility, social support, self-care, nurse–patient relationship, chronic disease, role overload, rational coping and night shift.

Conclusion.  Role boundary and role insufficiency were the factors that had the highest association with occupational stress. Occupational health education and occupational training programmes may be necessary to improve the knowledge and ability of nurses to cope with job demands and reduce occupational stress.

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