Curriculum infusion to promote nursing student well-being

Authors

  • Edilma Yearwood,

    1. Edilma Yearwood RN PMHCNS BC Associate Professor Department of Nursing, School of Nursing & Health Studies, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Joan B. Riley

    1. Joan B. Riley MS MSN FNP-BC Assistant Professor Department of Nursing and Department of Human Science, School of Nursing & Health Studies, Georgetown University, Washington, District of Columbia, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

E. Yearwood: e-mail: ely2@georgetown.edu

Abstract

yearwood e. & riley j.b. (2010) Curriculum infusion to promote nursing student well-being. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(6), 1356–1364.

Abstract

Title. Curriculum infusion to promote nursing student well-being.

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study of baccalaureate nursing students’ experiences with curriculum infusion of college health issues into academic courses and students’ well-being.

Background. Bringing Theory to Practice is an ongoing project at a number of colleges in the United States of America. Its goal is to use the academic classroom and campus community to engage students actively in self-reflection on a variety of common college student health and well-being issues.

Method.  This qualitative study was based on 159 students’ experiences with curriculum infusion in two undergraduate nursing courses at a university in the United States of America over a 2-year period from 2006 to 2008. Student reflection papers, photo-essays, narrative course evaluations, classroom engagement with educators and peers and student use of campus health resources were the data examined.

Findings.  As a result of the integration of personal wellness concepts into classroom pedagogy, students experienced a variety of feelings and needs including isolation, shock and anger, taking time, awareness and valuing.

Conclusion.  In light of the increasing rigour of baccalaureate nursing programmes, it is important for educators to be aware of the health-related effects of stress and isolation on students. By increasing student self-awareness and changing relational dynamics in the classroom, student well-being can be supported.

Ancillary