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Perceived support from healthcare practitioners among adults with type 2 diabetes

Authors


B. Oftedal: e-mail: bjorg.oftedal@uis.no

Abstract

oftedal b., karlsen b. & bru e. (2010) Perceived support from healthcare practitioners among adults with type 2 diabetes. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(7), 1500–1509.

Abstract

Title. Perceived support from healthcare practitioners among adults with type 2 diabetes.

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study of how adults with type 2 diabetes perceive different attributes of support provided by healthcare practitioners and how various attributes of support can influence people’s motivation to self-manage their disease.

Background.  Motivational problems seem to be a major reason for poor diabetes management. According to well-known theories of motivation, expectations of being able to perform certain behaviours are a key element. Different attributes of support from healthcare practitioners are likely to influence such expectations. To date, no researchers have specifically examined how people with type 2 diabetes perceive different attributes of support from healthcare practitioners and how these may influence their motivation to manage their disease themselves.

Methods.  A descriptive/explorative qualitative design and focus groups were used to collect data. The sample consisted of 19 adults with type 2 diabetes, and the data were collected in 2007 and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Findings.  Five themes were identified, reflecting perceived attributes of support from healthcare practitioners: (1) an empathetic approach, (2) practical advice and information, (3) involvement in decision-making, (4) accurate and individualized information and (5) ongoing group-based support.

Conclusion.  Healthcare practitioners may strengthen the self-management motivation among adults with type 2 diabetes by enhancing expectations of being able to perform the necessary diabetes care, and through the provision of empathetic, individualized, practical and ongoing group-based support.

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