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Keywords:

  • concept analysis;
  • Johnson’s behavioural system model;
  • nursing;
  • toileting behaviour;
  • urinary elimination;
  • women

wang k. & palmer m.h. (2010) Women’s toileting behaviour related to urinary elimination: concept analysis. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(8), 1874–1884.

Abstract

Title. Women’s toileting behaviour related to urinary elimination: concept analysis.

Aim.  This paper is a report of analysis of the concept of women’s toileting behaviour related to urinary elimination.

Background.  Behaviours related to emptying urine from the bladder can contribute to bladder health problems. Evidence exists that clinical interventions focusing on specific behaviours that promote urine storage and controlled emptying are effective in reducing lower urinary tract symptoms. The concept of women’s toileting behaviour related to urinary elimination has not been well-developed to guide nursing research and intervention.

Data sources.  The CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo and ISI Citation databases were searched for publications between January, 1960 and May, 2009, using combinations of keywords related to women’s toileting behaviour. Additional publications were identified by examining the reference lists in the papers identified.

Review methods.  Johnson’s behavioural system model provided the conceptual framework to identify the concept. Walker and Avant’s method was used for this concept analysis.

Results.  Women’s toileting behaviour related to urinary elimination can be defined as voluntary actions related to the physiological event of emptying the bladder, which is comprised of specific attributes including voiding place, voiding time, voiding position and voiding style. This behaviour is also influenced by the physical and social environments.

Conclusion.  An explicit definition of women’s toileting behaviour can offer a basis for nurses to understand the factors involved in women’s toileting behaviour. It also facilitates the development of an instrument to assess women’s toileting behaviour better, and to facilitate development of behavioural interventions designed to prevent, eliminate, reduce and manage female lower urinary tract symptoms.