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Keywords:

  • International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health;
  • NANDA-International Taxonomy II;
  • nursing diagnoses;
  • spinal cord injury

boldt c., grill e., bartholomeyczik s., brach m., rauch a., eriks-hoogland i. & stucki g. (2010) Combined application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the NANDA-International Taxonomy II. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(8), 1885–1898.

Abstract

Title. Combined application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the NANDA-International Taxonomy II.

Aim.  This paper presents a discussion of the conceptual and practical relationships between the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and the NANDA-International Taxonomy II for nursing diagnoses, and their use in nursing practice.

Background.  The ICF provides a common classification framework for all healthcare professionals, including nurses. Nursing care plans can be broadly based on NANDA-I taxonomies. No published attempt has been made to systematically compare the NANDA-I Taxonomy II to the ICF.

Data sources.  The most recently published descriptions of both classifications and a case example presenting the combined use of both classifications. The work was carried out in 2009.

Discussion.  There are conceptual commonalities and differences between the ICF and the NANDA-I Taxonomy II. In the case example, the overlap between the ICF categories and NANDA-I nursing diagnoses reflects the fact that the ICF, focusing on functioning and disability, and the NANDA-I Taxonomy II, with its functioning health patterns, are similar in their approaches.

Implications for nursing.  The NANDA-I Taxonomy II permits the fulfilment of requirements that are exclusively nursing issues. The application of the ICF is useful for nurses to communicate nursing issues with other healthcare professionals in a common language. For nurses, knowledge shared with other healthcare professionals may contribute to broader understanding of a patient’s situation.

Conclusion.  The ICF and the NANDA-I Taxonomy II should be used in concert by nurses and can complement each other to enhance the quality of clinical team work and nursing practice.