Factors predicting blood pressure control in older Chinese immigrants to the United States of America

Authors

  • Wen-Wen Li,

    1. Wen-Wen Li MS PhD RN Assistant Professor School of Nursing, San Francisco State University, and Adjunct Assistant Professor Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, USA
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  • Margaret I. Wallhagen,

    1. Margaret I. Wallhagen PhD GNP-BC FAAN Professor Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, USA
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  • Erika S. Froelicher

    1. Erika S. Froelicher PhD RN FAAN Professor Department of Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, and Adjunct Assistant Professor Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA
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W.-W. Li: e-mail: wenwenli@sfsu.edu

Abstract

li w.-w., wallhagen m.i. & froelicher e.s. (2010) Factors predicting blood pressure control in older Chinese immigrants to the United States of America. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(10), 2202–2212.

Abstract

Aim.  This paper is a report of a study of the extent to which demographic characteristics, medication-related factors, hypertension-related knowledge and medication adherence predict systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

Background.  Little is known about predictors of hypertension control in Chinese elders.

Methods.  A longitudinal study with a 3-month follow-up was conducted with 90 Chinese immigrants to the United States of America aged ≥65 years and recruited from 2006 to 2007. The independent variables were measured at baseline. Blood pressure was measured at 3 months. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the independent effects of seven variables on change in blood pressure at 3 months.

Results.  Participants ranged in age from 66 to 92 years (Mean 76·7, sd 6·6). The overall regression model for systolic blood pressure was statistically significant (R2 = 0·32, F = 4·37, P < 0·01). A higher number of prescribed oral medications (sr2 = 0·06, t = 2·42, P = 0·02) and lower medication adherence (sr2 = 0·07, t = −2·60, P = 0·01) were statistically significant determinants of an increased systolic blood pressure. The overall regression model for diastolic blood pressure was statistically significant (R2 = 0·21, F = 2·39, P = 0·03). Male gender (sr2 = 0·06, t = 2·26, P = 0·03) and lower medication adherence (sr2 = 0·11, t = −3·03, P < 0·01) were statistically significant determinants of an increased diastolic blood pressure.

Conclusion.  A greater number of prescribed medications and lower adherence predicted higher level of systolic blood pressure. Male gender and lower adherence were significantly associated with higher level of diastolic blood pressure. These predictors should be considered when designing interventions to help Chinese elders achieve better hypertension management.

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