Implementing evidence-based practice: effectiveness of a structured multifaceted mentorship programme

Authors

  • Gwenyth R. Wallen,

    1. Gwenyth R. Wallen PhD RN Chief of Nursing Research and Translational Science National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Sandra A. Mitchell,

    1. Sandra A. Mitchell PhD CRNP AOCN Clinical Nurse Scientist National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Bernadette Melnyk,

    1. Bernadette Melnyk PhD RN FAAN Dean and Distinguished Foundation Professor Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
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  • Ellen Fineout-Overholt,

    1. Ellen Fineout-Overholt PhD RN FAAN Clinical Professor & Director Center for the Advancement of Evidence-based Practice, Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
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  • Claiborne Miller-Davis,

    1. Claiborne Miller-Davis MS RN Nurse Specialist in Research National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Janice Yates,

    1. Janice Yates PhD RN Clinical Nurse Scientist (retired) National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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  • Clare Hastings

    1. Clare Hastings PhD RN FAAN Chief Nurse Officer for Nursing and Patient Care Services National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
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G.R. Wallen: e-mail: gwallen@cc.nih.gov

Abstract

wallen g.r., mitchell s.a., melnyk b., fineout-overholt e., miller-davis c., yates j. & hastings c. (2010) Implementing evidence-based practice: effectiveness of a structured multifaceted mentorship programme. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(12), 2761–2771.

Abstract

Aim.  This paper is a report of the effectiveness of a structured multifaceted mentorship programme designed to implement evidence-based practice in a clinical research intensive environment.

Background.  Barriers to implementing evidence-based practice are well-documented in the literature. Evidence-based practice is associated with higher quality care and better patient outcomes than care that is steeped in tradition. However, the integration of evidence-based practice implementation into daily clinical practice remains inconsistent, and the chasm between research and bedside practice remains substantial.

Methods.  This quasi-experimental mixed methods study included three focused discussions with nursing leadership and shared governance staff as well as pre- (N = 159) and post-intervention (N = 99) questionnaires administered between June 2006 and February 2007. Online questionnaires included measures of organizational readiness, evidence-based practice beliefs, evidence-based practice implementation, job satisfaction, group cohesion and intent to leave nursing and the current job.

Results.  Participants in the evidence-based practice mentorship programme had a larger increase in perceived organizational culture and readiness for evidence-based practice and in evidence-based practice belief scores than those who did not participate. Qualitative findings suggested that leadership support of a culture for evidence-based practice and the dedication of resources for sustainability of the initiative needed to be a priority for engaging staff at all levels.

Conclusion.  These findings corroborate other studies showing that nurses’ beliefs about evidence-based practice are significantly correlated with evidence-based practice implementation and that having a mentor leads to stronger beliefs and greater implementation by nurses as well as greater group cohesion, which is a potent predictor of nursing turnover rates.

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