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Keywords:

  • coronary heart disease;
  • quality of life;
  • symptoms

kimble l.p., dunbar s.b., weintraub w.s., mcguire d.b., manzo s.f. & strickland o.l. (2011) Symptom clusters and health-related quality of life in people with chronic stable angina. Journal of Advanced Nursing67(5), 1000–1011.

Abstract

Aim.  This paper reports findings of a study to examine the independent contribution of chest pain, fatigue and dyspnoea to health-related quality of life in people with chronic stable angina.

Background.  People with chronic stable angina experience poorer quality of life in multiple areas including physical and emotional health. Emerging evidence suggests the presence of concomitant symptoms yet there are no systematic studies examining the impact of symptom clusters on quality of life in people with chronic angina.

Method.  Outpatients (= 134), recruited over a 16-month period in 2000 and 2001, with confirmed coronary heart disease and chronic angina completed reliable and valid questionnaires measuring chest pain frequency, fatigue, dyspnoea and quality of life. The data have contemporary relevance because despite changes in treatment of coronary heart disease, chronic angina remains prevalent worldwide. Hierarchical multiple linear regression was used to examine the symptom cluster of chest pain frequency, fatigue and dyspnoea in predicting quality of life.

Results.  The sample was predominantly white (74·6%), men (59·7%) with a mean age of 63·4 (sd 12·12) years. Controlling for age, gender, social status and co-morbidities, the symptom cluster of chest pain frequency, dyspnoea and fatigue accounted for a statistically significant increase in unadjusted R2 (F of Δ, < 0·05) for the models predicting physical limitation (R2Δ 24·1%), disease perception (R2Δ 24·6%), Short Form-36 Physical Component Score (R2Δ 24·3%) and Mental Component Score (R2Δ 07·0%).

Conclusion.  Symptom assessment and management of people with chronic stable angina should involve multiple symptoms. Greater fatigue predicted poorer quality of life in multiple areas. As a possible indicator of depression, it warrants further assessment and follow-up.