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Self-efficacy and its influence on recovery of patients with stroke: a systematic review

Authors

  • Corrie Korpershoek,

    1. Corrie Korpershoek MSc RN
      Clinical Nurse Specialist
      Department of Neurosurgery and Neurology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Jaap van der Bijl,

    1. Jaap van der Bijl PhD RN
      Associate Professor
      Masters Advanced Nursing Practice and Physician Assistant, Faculty of Health, Welfare and Sports, Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Thóra B. Hafsteinsdóttir

    1. Thóra B. Hafsteinsdóttir PhD RN
      Associate Professor
      Division of Neuroscience of the Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neurosciences, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands,
      Research Centre for Innovations in Health-care, University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht, The Netherlands,
      and
      Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland
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T. Hafsteinsdóttir: e-mail: t.hafsteinsdottir@umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

korpershoek c., van der bijl j. & hafsteinsdóttir t.b. (2011) Self-efficacy and its influence on recovery of patients with stroke: a systematic review. Journal of Advanced Nursing 67(9), 1876–1894.

Abstract

Aims.  To provide an overview of the literature focusing on the influence of self-efficacy and self-efficacy enhancing interventions on mobility, activities of daily living, depression and quality of life of patients with stroke.

Background.  There is growing evidence for the importance of self-efficacy in the care of people with enduring illness. Therefore, it is important to describe the association of self-efficacy and patient outcomes and the evidence for the effects of self-efficacy interventions for stroke patients.

Data sources.  Studies were retrieved from a systematic search of published studies over the period of 1996–2009, indexed in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Psychinfo and Embase and focusing on stroke, the influence of self-efficacy and self-efficacy enhancing interventions.

Methods.  A systematic review was carried out. Studies were critically appraised and important characteristics and outcomes were extracted and summarized.

Results.  Seventeen articles were included in the review. Self-efficacy was positively associated with mobility, activities of daily living and quality of life and negatively associated with depression. Four self-efficacy interventions were identified. The evidence for the effects of these interventions was inconclusive.

Conclusions.  Patients with high self-efficacy are functioning better in daily activities than patients with low self-efficacy. The evidence concerning the determinants influencing self-efficacy and the self-efficacy interventions makes clear how nurses can develop and tailor self-efficacy interventions for the clinical practice of people with stroke. Therefore, it is necessary to further emphasize the role of self-efficacy in the care for stroke patients in the nursing curriculum.

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