A path model of health-related quality of life in Type 2 diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study in Taiwan

Authors


R.-H. Wang: e-mail: wrhsia@kmu.edu.tw

Abstract

wang r.-h., wu l.-c. & hsu h.-y. (2011) A path model of health-related quality of life in Type 2 diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study in Taiwan. Journal of Advanced Nursing67(12), 2658–2667.

Abstract

Aims.  To construct a path model about relationships of perceptions of empowerment, diabetes distress, self-care behaviour and glycemic control to health-related quality of life in Taiwanese Type 2 diabetic patients, suffering from diabetes for 10 years or less.

Background.  Health-related quality of life is the primary end point for people with diabetes. Understanding the path model of health-related quality of life in Type 2 diabetic patients is useful for nurses to design early intervention programmes.

Methods.  This was a cross-sectional study. An anonymous questionnaire was used to collect data from 2007 to 2008. Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was also collected. Data from 428 Type 2 diabetic patients were analysed with structural equation modelling to test the fit of the hypothesized path model to the data.

Results.  A model was produced in which self-care behaviour had a statistically significantly direct influence on satisfaction, impact and worry aspects of health-related quality of life. Glycosylated haemoglobin had a statistically significantly negative influence on satisfaction, and impact aspects of health-related quality of life. Perceptions of empowerment had a statistically significantly direct influence on satisfaction aspect of health-related quality of life. Diabetes distress had a statistically significantly direct influence on satisfaction, impact and worry aspects of health-related quality of life.

Conclusions.  Nurses should develop new approaches to improve various aspects of health-related quality of life. Nurses could empower patients to improve satisfaction aspect of health-related quality of life. To improve the impact and worry aspects of health-related quality of life, nurses should reduce diabetes distress felt by patients.

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